Agile Coaching Institute http://agilecoachinginstitute.com Providing Agile Coaches & Leaders with Transformational Skills and Tools Wed, 11 Oct 2017 01:57:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.6 Tending to ACI’s Transformational Impact through Partnership with SolutionsIQ http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/tending-acis-transformational-impact-partnership-solutionsiq/ Fri, 04 Aug 2017 10:45:00 +0000 http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/?p=7143 What do you call a deeply skilled agile coach and trainer who has also spent hundreds of hours honing their skills as a professional coach?   We call that a good start.   We are building ACI’s delivery capability. The demand for our industry-leading agile...

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What do you call a deeply skilled agile coach and trainer who has also spent
hundreds of hours honing their skills as a professional coach?

 

We call that a good start.

 

We are building ACI’s delivery capability. The demand for our industry-leading agile coaching course curriculum has continued to grow. It’s on the rise, in fact. ACI’s mission has always been to develop agile coaches as powerful change agents. To allow that mission to flourish, we need to grow, too.

But not growth at the sacrifice of quality.

That feels unethical to us. You see, when we use words like “transformation” and “immersive” in our course descriptions, that’s not marketing hype. It’s what our students say.

Last year, ACI began a partnership with SolutionsIQ to grow with quality. SolutionsIQ welcomes the rigor and investment required so that “transformational” and “immersive” continue to be accurate descriptors of ACI’s coaching curriculum and mission.

When Michael Spayd and I, co-founders of ACI, realized that ACI needed a more capable platform to pursue its work in the world, the only people we thought to approach were John and Charlie Rudd, the leaders of SolutionsIQ. We had known John and Charlie for years as colleagues and desirable collaboration partners and knew they would uphold ACI’s exacting quality standards, especially our co-leader teaching model. That model is expensive and looks like a poor business choice from a certain angle, and is absolutely necessary for the kind of impact we want to have on our students. It’s a big reason why ACI’s agile coaching curriculum is reliably transformational.

The ACI curriculum helps agile coaches master the practical tools, but more than that – agile coaches start upgrading their internal “operating system” as a result of our courses. It’s not just a mindset shift that happens, it’s a whole world-view shift that catalyzes a set of significant internal shifts.

What allows those shifts to happen reliably and safely is the professional coaching skill of ACI’s co-leaders. Yes, we are training people in agile coaching tools, models, and skills. Obviously co-leaders have to be deeply knowledgeable in these areas. What might not be so obvious is that we are also creating a deep and authentic learning environment that evokes real change. When people are up to real change, they need the skill of a professional coach to help them safely capture the full force of that change. That’s why an “entrance criteria” for ACI co-leaders includes professional coaching training and skill gained from masters in the coaching profession outside the agile world.

Back to the initial question… If we call a deeply skilled agile coach and trainer who has also spent hundreds of hours developing and honing their skills as a professional coach a good starting point, what’s left to do? Quite a lot, as it turns out. Just as our students go through a “hero’s journey” in our courses, co-leaders-in-development go through their own hero’s journey to be ready to truly lead ACI’s courses. During this time, a set of defined competencies guide us and give the co-leaders-in-development a no nonsense way to know if they are hitting the mark. We have already been active with co-leader development in preparation for ACI’s expansion. Louis Morisset, ACI alumnus and assistant at a recent Agile Coach Bootcamp, saw the process and has this to report:

“I had the chance to see firsthand some of the new trainers working their craft under the vigilant but ever so caring eyes of ACI’s faculty. The effort in preparation and training that these trainers undergo to be allowed to call themselves ACI co-leaders blew me away. As those new trainers become fully-fledged co-leaders, trust me, they will uphold the highest standards of quality that made ACI what it is today. They will be able to go out and inspire others like ACI’s founders inspired me. I have no doubt in my mind.”

That hero’s journey takes about six months of focused attention and practice. It mirrors the tried-and-true methods of creating masters in a craft: First, learn from the master. Then, participate and learn by doing (and failing and learning more). Finally, lead as a peer. Eventually, become a master capable of developing other leaders in the craft.  At each of these steps the learning is immediate and personal. It expands everyone involved. We think of it this way: if we can’t go through the fire to change ourselves, why would you trust us to guide you through it? By the time a co-leader is leading as a peer, they have gone through several such fires.

Now that SolutionsIQ has been acquired by Accenture, I find ACI’s work with SolutionsIQ unchanged. We are still involved with the same people and, if anything, the level of commitment has risen. I am happy to report that the folks I have met from Accenture have been open, curious and collaborative which is a welcome discovery.

ACI courses will continue to be produced by SolutionsIQ and staffed by a mixture of the original ACI faculty and SolutionsIQ faculty. Our partnership remains strong. As a result, ACI is more capable of realizing its purpose: to equip agile coaches to be the change leaders that are so keenly needed.

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Using the InspireMe! cardsto Slow Down, Look Around http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/slow-down-look-around/ http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/slow-down-look-around/#comments Mon, 12 Dec 2016 14:05:30 +0000 http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/?p=6835 From the desk of our Agile friend and Coach, Deborah Preuss…   Did you know that our InspireMe! coaching deck includes exercises to try? Here’s how we used them to slow down as we kicked off a coach retreat. (Let me know what experiments you...

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From the desk of our Agile friend and Coach, Deborah Preuss

 

Did you know that our InspireMe! coaching deck includes exercises to try?
Here’s how we used them to slow down as we kicked off a coach retreat.

(Let me know what experiments you try!)

InspireMe! Try This card

I recently had the honor of helping 40 agile coaches kick off a CoReDay in my own city, Karlsruhe, Germany. Knowing they’d be coming off of trains, buses and bikes, I wanted to offer them a few moments to slow down, breathe, and choose a direction, before the delicious day began.

I invited them to “clear their desk,” to put aside urgencies and other people’s opinions, and to get a feel for what was really important for them today – it could be anything from problem solving to skill building or listening or teaching.

In the cool Blue Box by supplies last…order the
InspireMe! card deck for an Agile friend (or two).

 

Then I invited them to consider the “stance” in which we’d approach our interactions that day, drawing particular attention to Generosity, Authenticity and Courage.

And at the end of my talk, I wanted to experimented with the InspireMe! cards that Lyssa, John and I crafted this year. Their arresting images and heart-felt encouragement are designed for *exactly* this crowd… but there was no way they could thoughtfully read even a few! What to do? I found inspiration the Try This  card called  Pro-spective.

I offered them 5 minutes to set a direction or intention or goal for the day, in any way they liked: sit quietly, write, go for a walk … or peruse the InspireMe! cards for a spark or impulse (with a warning: do not try to read them! Just grab one that sends you in the right direction.) I’d laid out two decks: on one side of the room with the pictures facing up, and on the other side of the room, another set, flipped so people could see the big words at the bottom of each. (I find words harder to process fast, but some people prefer them.)

At the end of 5 minutes, I invited them to rejoin the circle, and NOT share what they’d decided on. (We who facilitate groups know: even the most inspired plan must be held very lightly, with readiness to throw it out the window when something more resonant appears.)  Instead, I asked “what two words do you want to speak into the room, as we start the day?” We quietly went once around the circle, and then on to our practice sessions!

I was surprised how many had chosen words from multiple cards … and then were reluctant to give them up afterwards! A smartphone photo would have to do…

(click to enlarge, to read these cards)

Just a few InspireMe! Cards

 

Since then, I’ve thought up several more ways to use them with a group, for example:

  • for a large group, shuffle two decks (same number of cards as people in the room) and have each pick a resonant card on a theme (your teams, your future, etc.). Then find the person with a matching card and take turns explaining your card’s significance. It will be noisy!
  • The advice, exercises and images on the cards were carefully selected to address, and sometimes challenge, the work of Agilists and other change agents. We hope you’ll pick a random one for yourself when journaling, or put “the right one” on your desk for encouragement for a week, or try the 15 Try This exercises… and create your own!

    How do you use them for personal reflection? How will they inspire your teams? I’d love to hear what you try in the comments section below!

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    Partnership & Transformation http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/partnership-and-transformation/ http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/partnership-and-transformation/#comments Thu, 21 Jul 2016 02:00:35 +0000 http://dev.agilecoachinginstitute.com/?p=6353 Partnership has been on my mind lately: what it is, how it works, when it’s right. And transformation is always in the back of my mind, being my one-word mission in life. Over the course of this year, I’ve begun to see how deeply connected...

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    Partnership has been on my mind lately: what it is, how it works, when it’s right. And transformation is always in the back of my mind, being my one-word mission in life. Over the course of this year, I’ve begun to see how deeply connected the two are. This blog announces some news, and some connections, about each.

    A joint press release with our friends at SolutionsIQ (SIQ) today announces the most important partnership ACI has embarked upon thus far. Under our agreement, SIQ coaches will begin teaching ACI’s core curriculum, The Agile Facilitator and Coaching Agile Teams, plus Agile Coach Bootcamps (which combine the two classes). For SIQ, this move will allow them to bring the best Agile coach training available to the wider market, something only the largest pure play Agile consultancy is in a position to do. We are thrilled SIQ is making such a serious investment in the Agile Coach learning framework stewarded byICAgile, and in developing competency in the transformational learning paradigm that ACI introduced to the Agile world. For them, it represents a serious investment in their people to meet ACI’s very rigorous quality standards.

    For ACI, the move allows us to utilize a trusted partner to teach our core curriculum, while we are enabled to expand our impact into further endeavors: a broader and deeper training curriculum on the one hand, and transformational coaching and consulting on the other. It also invites us to take on a new competency: training folks to lead our classes in the transformational, co-leading style that has become our trademark. This training and development process is already well underway, with five SIQ senior consultants having been identified and begun their training, under Lyssa’s guidance. When I say serious, I don’t think it is hyperbole. SIQ people will go through at least six months with us to be fully certified, plus take on a professional coaching and/or leadership program with some of the people that taught us. The full transition will likely take 15-18 months.

    So that’s one partnership leading to a transformation for each of the partners. Here’s a transformation that led to a new partnership…

    As Lyssa, Michael Hamman and I have worked to develop and hone our training approach and the ACI platform, we have grown hungry to actively re-enter the coaching and consulting world. Imprisoned in a way by our own success, we struggled for a couple of years to start up a consulting group. Then early this year — immersed in Bob Anderson and Bill Adams book, Mastering Leadership — I had a fundamental insight. As the senior leader of ACI, our inability to start something new was most likely a shortcoming in my own leadership. After all, we had a new approach to transformation,  the Integral Agile Transformation Framework™ outlined in my upcoming book, Coaching the Agile Enterprise. We had also developed deep skill in executive coaching, systems coaching and organizational change. The thing that was missing was a transformation of our organization, and my leadership was key to that happening.

    A public commitment to increasing my effectiveness started things rolling. The organization responded unbelievably well. My own commitment to be more heart-centered in my leadership (countering my high levels of arrogance, as measured by the Leadership Circle Profile), was met by enthusiastic energy and self-development in everyone else in the system. Perhaps the biggest key to launching a new transformation-oriented consultancy was adding a new partner, one that had not spent the last six years developing a training organization, but had remained immersed in Agile transformations, then built and led a large Agile consulting practice. That partner is Michele Madore, perhaps the most effective, genuine, and humble leader I have ever known. Because of those attributes, and the alignment of our visions, Michele and I decided to co-found the new organization, bringing a different voice and perspective into the launch and leadership of this new practice.

    With a combined 40 plus years in the Agile transformation soup — boasting some significant successes but also humbled by some real disappointments — Michael, Lyssa, Michele and I joined to articulate a new approach. Led by Michele’s frustration with business-as-usual in the Agile transformation space, we committed ourselves to “transforming transformations”. We are committed to pioneering a new way, one that begins with senior leadership’s own transformation, as we found was key to our own change.

    Throughout 2016, we have prepared for the launch of this new organization, called Trans4mation, a sister-company to the Agile Coaching Institute. Trans4mation is developing a variety of services, from helping develop internal capacity for an organization’s agile coaching, to leadership coaching and development for executives, to strategic transformational consulting to help clients realistically assess what is possible given their organization’s culture, then helping implement a full-scale transformation. All of these services are knit together into a philosophy of change leadership that believes authentic transformation is only possible when it comes from the top, beginning within the hearts and minds of the organization’s senior leaders.

    We know Trans4mation will not be for everyone. Frankly, we are not looking to serve traditional clients, since we don’t believe that is where our own working edge is located. Rather, we are looking for clients who want to work at the cutting edge of consciousness, individual and organizational. Working at our own edge leads to the best work we can do. Michele will serve as President of Trans4mation, with Lyssa Adkins, Michael Hamman and I all becoming principals, leading some aspect of the practice.

    The idea ofAgile Coaching Institute and Trans4mation being “sister companies” is made real by our common vision: To up-shift organizational consciousness by evolving coach-leaders and organizational-leaders.

    For Agile Coaching Institute, that will mean filling out our current curriculum by extending into the full range of our Agile Coach Competency model in Technical and Business mastery, expanding our Enterprise coach offerings, and helping others utilize our Teaching methods. We are excited about how the partnership with SIQ enables us to expand into this new course development, in further partnership with others. Lyssa will remain as President of ACI, and I will be CEO of both ACI and Trans4mation.

    We hope all this transformation and all these partnerships will serve you, our constituents. We are learning as we go. So, there’s one more partnership to create: one with you. Whether you’re a potential client, a partner, or an industry collaborator, we need to know what you think, need to hear your visions, to see the world as you see it. Let’s discover where this new transformation path leads.

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    Lyssa Adkins Calls for Patience: Agile Transformation as a Human Development Challenge http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/lyssa-adkins-calls-for-patience-agile-transformation-as-a-human-development-challenge/ Sat, 23 Apr 2016 19:41:37 +0000 http://dev.agilecoachinginstitute.com/?p=6472 This past week, I (Lyssa) was honored to be part of the Scrum Gathering’s final TED-talk-style-mashup closing keynote. Part of a 5-person team each delivering a 15 minute no slides message, I got to deliver the final words on this Gathering. Thought you’d like to...

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    This past week, I (Lyssa) was honored to be part of the Scrum Gathering’s final TED-talk-style-mashup closing keynote. Part of a 5-person team each delivering a 15 minute no slides message, I got to deliver the final words on this Gathering. Thought you’d like to see an audience-captured video (thanks, Jason Tanner) and, as I was about to trash my practice notes I thought better of it and decided to share them with you.

    And, my practice notes…
    Pg 1 - SGFLA Practice Notes
    Pg 2 - SGFLA Practice Notes
    Pg 3 - SGFLA Practice Notes

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    Want Organizational Agility? Develop an Internal Agile Coaching Capability. http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/want-organizational-agility-develop-an-internal-agile-coaching-capability/ Fri, 13 Nov 2015 15:51:54 +0000 http://www.agilecoachinginstitute.com/?p=5261 Most companies that transition to Agile do so because they want the speed and innovation that Agile promises. However, to realize that organizations need solid Agile Coaches to help establish the deep, institutional capability required to become a truly agile organization. Team agility is a first step, but ultimately withers without...

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    Most companies that transition to Agile do so because they want the speed and innovation that Agile promises. However, to realize that organizations need solid Agile Coaches to help establish the deep, institutional capability required to become a truly agile organization. Team agility is a first step, but ultimately withers without organizational agility. Organizational agility requires an agile coaching capability to establish self-organized teams (a new organization innovation), as well as a new form of agile leadership amongst management, and a re-thinking of organizational structures, policies and culture.

    Most ScrumMasters and Agile Coaches inside organizations are assigned to the role by default, quite often without the requisite skill to foster team agility, much less organizational agility. Yet, this is precisely what organizations need of them. To answer the need, an internal agile coaching capability must be built. In our years developing agile coaches, we see that the creating internal agile coaching capability is not only possible, it is quite straightforward.

    In this whitepaper we answer these key questions:
    Why do Organizations Need an Agile Coaching Capability?
    What Business Benefits would an Internal Agile Coaching Capability Make Available?
    What are the Broad Functions for an Agile Coaching Capability?
    What are the Developmental Levels of an Agile Coaching Capability?
    How Do Organizations Build an Agile Coaching Capability?
    What Should You Expect from Competent Coaches?

    Read the full white paper: Developing an Internal Agile Coaching Capability

    Want us to help you build your internal agile coaching capability? We know how to do it, and would be happy to help. Contact us.

     

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    The Agile Manager’s Practice: Seeding and Cultivating Agile Champions http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/the-agile-managers-practice-seeding-and-cultivating-agile-champions/ http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/the-agile-managers-practice-seeding-and-cultivating-agile-champions/#comments Wed, 02 Sep 2015 18:38:18 +0000 http://www.agilecoachinginstitute.com/?p=5145 As we all know, the job of the Agile manager is challenging. One of the manager’s biggest challenges is giving up the old mindset that managing is about ‘driving to results.’  In fact, as we teach in our Managing Agile Environments class, one of the mindset...

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    As we all know, the job of the Agile manager is challenging. One of the manager’s biggest challenges is giving up the old mindset that managing is about ‘driving to results.’  In fact, as we teach in our Managing Agile Environments class, one of the mindset shifts which the agile manager undergoes is the shift from managing (or driving) to results to designing environments that generate results.

    One key environment design practice is to cultivate relationships with, and empower agile ‘champions’ within your organization.  Agile champions are individuals, from different parts (and levels) of your organization, who may or may not be on agile teams, who are passionate about the transformational potential of agile, and have some particular skill or set of connections to bring agile thinking and capability to their particular area of work.

    Two Kinds of Champions

    raisedfist1There are two kinds of agile champions: the Activist and the Sleeper Cell.  

    The Activist tends to have a somewhat pronounced role in the organization—he or she may be a dev lead, a QA lead, or an experienced PO—and he or she uses that role to influence others.

    These are the people who—if sufficiently empowered and enabled by their managers—will start up and organize truly vibrant communities of practice, coding ‘dojos’, agile lunches (devoted to specific topics that are highly relevant for particular audiences).  The agile activist is something of a ‘loud mouth’ (but not in an annoying way!).

    The Sleeper Cell is the person who is likely not working on an agile team, and in fact may not be directly affiliated with agile, per se.  However, he or she has seen the possibility that agility can bring to the organization more broadly and simply bide their time until they can bring agile wisdom to bear just at the right moment.  Such a person, for instance, might be involved with regulatory compliance, where their insights about how agile thinking could improve the compliance process blossoms just at the moment when the new compliance process is being drafted. 

    Another such person might be in charge of negotiating a contract with an offshore QA provider, and has the forethought to include in the contract a requirement that offshore QA have daily ‘check-in’ (i.e. daily stand-up) meetings with their onshore development counterparts.

    Both Activists and Sleeper Cells in effect do part of the work of agile management, which is seeding conditions that favor the gradual adoption of agile practices, particularly in places, and at moments, you as the manager may not think to do. These people are, in a very real sense, your partners and your helpers.

    Growing Agile Champions

    pours on seedling, watering young treeHow can you grow Agile champions? There are three steps: Expose, Identify, Relate and Enable :

    • Expose: creating a variety of occasions in which people throughout your organization, especially those who are not on Agile teams but who may be curious about Agile, learn about the principles of Agile. Such events include 90 minute agile orientations, 60 minute Scrum, XP, and Kanban games, town halls that are devoted to talking about your vision, as a manager, for Agile and what it could provide for the organization.
    • Identify: You want to keep an eye out for people who seem particularly interested in Agile. These are the people who ask questions during an event. Or they stay after to ask follow-up questions. Their comments and reflections during an event seem right on.  Or sometimes you just see a glint in their eyes which suggests that something about Agile has truly touched or inspired them.
    • Relate/Enable: Find a way to connect 1-on-1 with that person. Grab a coffee or lunch. Invite them for a 20 minute chat. Find out what they think about Agile and how they think it might be relevant in their particular work sphere. Ask them how the might bring agile thinking to their own work world. Ask them if there is anything you could do to help them. 

    Growing and cultivating Agile Champions is a key practice of designing environments. It is far more than delegating: it is quite literally cultivating conditions, in terms of actual human behavior and action, in which agile practice can blossom and fruit, organically, within your organization.

    Want to learn more? See our white paper, ‘The Agile Leader’, for more in-depth reading. Or, go to our schedule page to find upcoming Managing Agile Environment classes.

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    Agile Coaching Then and Now: Why We HAD to Update the Coaching Agile Teams Class http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/agile-coaching-then-and-now-why-we-had-to-update-the-coaching-agile-teams-class/ Tue, 31 Mar 2015 23:09:27 +0000 http://www.agilecoachinginstitute.com/?p=4783 When we started teaching the Coaching Agile Teams class back in 2010, the field was different: it was more about teaching teams the basics of Agile, then standing back to watch the magic. Now, teams (and their coaches and ScrumMasters) are faced with pressures and...

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    When we started teaching the Coaching Agile Teams class back in 2010, the field was different: it was more about teaching teams the basics of Agile, then standing back to watch the magic. Now, teams (and their coaches and ScrumMasters) are faced with pressures and complexities that make the job considerably more difficult. The pressure to increase organizational agility, the need to scale, management misunderstanding of Agile philosophy, many more roles than the basic three, team conflict and resistance; all these add up to a more difficult environment in which to coach.

    This webinar — hosted by Lyssa Adkins (author of Coaching Agile Teams) and Michael Spayd (author of the upcoming Coaching the Agile Enterprise) — was recorded on March 31, 2015 and walks you through some of these changes, helps you understand why we updated our flagship course using the Integral Agile Operating System™, and offers a few practical tips on what you can take back to your own world.

    Click to download the audio:  Agile Coaching Then and Now Webinar (stored on FilesAnywhere)

    Guide to the Webinar

    Use this guide to follow along with the webinar recording, or to skip to the part you really want to hear first. Click on a slide to open it in full screen. Please do not re-use the slides without permission.

    Welcome to the Webinar!

    0:00 – 8:50

    • Welcome
    • Who’s Here?  What Roles?
    • Who is Lyssa Adkins? Michael Spayd? Michael Hamman? Who is ACI?
    • A shout out for Michael Hamman’s work in helping develop agile managers.
    • Coaching Agile Teams version 1.0 vs version 2.0 vs version 3.0.

    Someone doing agile coaching...
    8:50 – 13:00

    • The job of the agile coach: what it was 5 years ago
    • Getting teams up and running + defining the role of agile coaching = “We’re doing agile now. Isn’t that cool?”
    • Nostalgic for the euphoria of early delivery
    • 5 years later: Now we have teams up and running and agile teams are almost the norm. Yet, not all is rosy.
    • Agile is revealing organizational dysfunctions, plus there is plenty to do inside teams. We haven’t cracked the code on that yet.
    • The agile coach’s purview has widened because agile is much more accepted now, yet not necessarily made easy in organizations.

    Team Complexity Soup

    13:00 – 15:00

    • It’s surely a soup, but how does it smell? Probably not as good as what Lyssa has cooking in the crock pot.
    • It’s a complicated, complex environment: both inside and outside teams.
    • This is the situation we’re all in.
    • Some of these things we have control or influence over, some we don’t.

     

    What's New in CAT 3.0?

    15:00 – 19:00

    • What’s new in Coaching Agile Teams version 3.0.
    • Bottom  line: Working more directly with complex environments.
    • Integral Agile Operating System™: huh?  A meta-model that does justice to everything out there.  It doesn’t choose this model over that model. Or this way over that way.  It’s a place to house everything and see the complex environment more clearly.
    • Integral Agile Operating System™ is the underlying organization of the class now.  It helps coaches make more choice-ful decisions of where to intervene, and where to let be.
    • Role complexity has really increased in the industry since we started teaching this class.  ACI has a lot to say about the role of managers and how they can be more agile-acting.
    • We also see a lot of benefit to understanding how group cultures evolve: at the individual people, team and whole org levels.  This, along with working with impediments to product flow, are now directly addressed in the class.

    Agile Coaching Competency Framework

    19:00 – 24:40

    • The Agile Coaching Competency Framework (creative commons license) has been used in the Coaching Agile Teams class since the beginning.
    • It is used as the basis of the first 1.5 days of CAT 3.0.
    • It’s not enough to be an Agile-Lean Practitioner as an agile coach.  Yes, it’s the biggest wedge because it’s “table stakes” for the game, so keeping current and practicing Agile-Lean is important. And, not enough by itself.
    • You need skills from both the content side (Teaching, Mentoring) and the process side (Professional Coaching, Facilitating).
    • Michael Spayd asks, “How has this model evolved for us?”
    • We’re surprised this model has remained so amazingly stable and continues to be so insightful for people when they encounter it. We keep finding more depth in this model.
    • People use this model to hone themselves as the instrument of their craft, to develop themselves.
    • Since we started teaching this class, the idea of Professional Coaching was not understood by most. Now, things like Powerful Questions, listening and other professional coaching skills are part of a commonplace agile community conversation. It’s been a change in the community; a recognition that the Professional Coaching skill set is important.
    • People see that their Mentoring gets better when it’s informed by Professional Coaching skills.  We get in touch with how we have created a new, and clear, Mentoring method.

    Integral Agile Team View

    24:40 – 36:25

    • This is a team-level view of the Integral Agile Operating System™.
    • Michael gives a tutorial of the 4 quadrants and their relevance to coaching at the agile team level.
    • The 4 quadrants are different perspectives on the same situation.
    • Any quadrant (perspective) by itself is not enough.
    • Each quadrant is a window to look through to “see” the complex environment. Each has different logic and techniques associated with it, and all four taken together give a more complete view.
    • We ask, “How healthy?” is the team in each quadrant.
    • All these taken together provide powerful ways to assess team health and increase it.
    • The CAT 3.0 class gives tools for each quadrant for the ultimate goal of sustainably increasing value flow, which is the purpose of agile.
    • The circles are the vertical dimension of the Integral Agile Operating System™. They represent the level of complexity within any quadrant.
    • Agile itself comes from a more complex level of development. Yet, sometimes the environment agile operates in is a simpler (less complex) stage of development. So, there is a mismatch, sometimes even a clash.
    • Having a wide variety of skills (look back at the Agile Coaching Competency Framework) and knowing how to look from different perspectives (through the Integral Agile Operating System™) gives coaches a full toolkit with which to be highly effective.
    • Base models of  Integral Agile Operating System™ are Integral Theory and Spiral Dynamics, from outside the agile community.

    Complete Agile Coach Development Program

    36:25 – 41:45

    • ACI now has a complete Agile Coaching Development Path.  (Jazz hands) We have been envisioning this for five years!
    • In-person classes on the left in the diagram; in the middle, the Certification Competency Cohort is a 10 month program to build real, demonstrable skills.
    • Both pieces yield the first-ever ACI certification: the ACI Certified Transformation CoachTeams. And, the ICAgile Expert – Agile Coaching, if desired.
    • The Competency Cohort is modeled after our Professional Coaching Certification experience, which was rigorous and competency-based.
    • A ScrumMaster would take The Agile Facilitator (TAF) once they have 3 months of experience on agile teams. Anyone can take it at any time, but that’s a logical place to start. And, it’s the most important skill set for ScrumMasters.
    • The Agile Coach Bootcamp consists of TAF and CAT in one 5-day retreat setting. It’s an intense transformation process and learning community.

    Upcoming Classes41:45 – 57:24

    • We gave a shout-out for our upcoming classes that are part of the Agile Coach Development Program.
    • We took questions:
      • Brian: “How complimentary is the Competency Cohort and certifications to the Certified Scrum Coach (CSC)?” Lyssa reveals her plan to work with the Scrum Alliance to see how the rigor of this program might give people credit toward the CSC. At the same time, the CSC is more suitable for an enterprise coach, whereas our Competency Cohort is for a program level coach.
      • Steve: “When can we expect this Competency Cohort to start up? When can I sign up?” Description and registration will be up soon; first one to start in September.
      • Nicole: “How long is the Agile Coach Bootcamp?” Five days; people arrive Sunday night and leave on evening flight Friday. To get a flavor of what it’s really like, here’s a video of what alumni say about the Bootcamp.
      • Jeff: “What does Integral Agile look like at the practice level?” It doesn’t look much different than really well-done agile practices (however rare that may be; it attunes your expectations and actions to the altitude of complexity of the team you are working with. It gives you a different context for thinking about what to do.
      • Michael Hamman gives a brief overview of Managing Agile Environments which helps managers with their core question “Now what’s my role?”  This class helps managers shift from “managing to results” to “creating environments that produce results.”  Upcoming webinar on this: April 28th at 1pm Eastern. Stay tuned.
      • ACI continues to evolve, and we continue to grow ourselves as individuals.  You, our community, are our partners in this. You pull these new offerings out of us.

     

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    How Do I Become An Agile Coach?(If I’m an Agile PM/ScrumMaster) http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/how-do-i-become-an-agile-coachif-im-an-agile-pmscrummaster/ http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/how-do-i-become-an-agile-coachif-im-an-agile-pmscrummaster/#comments Mon, 09 Mar 2015 13:56:56 +0000 http://www.agilecoachinginstitute.com/?p=4717 Let’s say you’ve been a Project Manager for many years and moved on to the next “job” in project management to become a Agile PM/ScrumMaster. But, instead of a “job” you found a calling and you not only like the agile world, you love it....

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    Let’s say you’ve been a Project Manager for many years and moved on to the next “job” in project management to become a Agile PM/ScrumMaster. But, instead of a “job” you found a calling and you not only like the agile world, you love it.  That’s what happened to Padmini Nidumolu.

    After a few years as a practicing Agile PM/ScrumMaster, Padmini’s natural question was, “How do I get to do more of this agile thing that I love?”  Over time, her question shifted to, “How do I become a really good Agile Coach?” which is when we sat down together to explore the question and offer some answers.

    Here’s a guide book to the conversation:
    1:50 Padmini says: “I found various websites and various certification bodies. There are a lot of options out there, CSP, CSM — it’s like a potpourri of alphabets which really don’t make sense to everyone.  I want to learn a methodical approach for how I can work myself up from being a CSM all the way to Agile Coach.”
    In Lyssa’s answer, learn about:
    • An Agile Coaching learning path which is separate from certifications, but participates with various certifications.
    • How the Learning Path is transparent, and shows how to progress from level to level without it being a big mystery.
    3:51 Lyssa runs down the certifications available at Scrum Alliance to develop one’s self as an Agile Coach and how Agile Coaching Institute’s courses contribute to those.
    5:30 Padmini asks: “With ACI being accredited with Scrum Alliance, does that put us well on our way to become a CST and a CSC?”  In Lyssa’s answer, learn about the difference between CST and CSC and how that relates to coaching courses.
    7:03 Lyssa runs down the certifications available at ICAgile and how they work.
    In Lyssa’s answer, learn about:
    • Continuing education certifications for attending classes and attaining learning objectives — like getting credits in a University.
    • ICAgile gives you the materials you will be scored on when you go for the ICAgile Expert certification.
    • Even if you don’t care about certifications, the materials for the ICAgile Expert gate tell you what level of skill and competence is expected, so you can use it to develop yourself.

    Video 2 starts with Padmini’s question: “What can we expect in your classes and what beyond what ACI offers is needed to fill the gap at ScrumAlliance or ICAgile?”
    In Lyssa’s answer, learn about:
    • How the Coaching Agile Teams class and The Agile Facilitator class cover all the agile coaching learning objectives.
    • How you can take them separately and in a bootcamp format.
    • How you can get close the gap between classroom knowledge and real-world competence through ACI’s mentoring program, and how the mentoring program builds your competence with skill drills and scored supervisions.
    3:30 Padmini asks: “Does ACI provide any certification?”
    In Lyssa’s answer, learn about:
    • ACI’s competence-based certification after taking the classes and mentoring program.
    • ACI’s transformation agile coaching certification beyond that.

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    Announcing an Exciting New Workshop for Agile Managers! http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/announcing-an-exciting-new-workshop-for-agile-managers/ Fri, 19 Dec 2014 19:49:54 +0000 http://www.agilecoachinginstitute.com/?p=4593 In my 11 years coaching in agile enterprises, it has struck me that while we in the Agile community continue to develop ever greater tools and practices supporting the evolution of agile teams, programs, and agile coaches, it remains the case that very little has...

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    In my 11 years coaching in agile enterprises, it has struck me that while we in the Agile community continue to develop ever greater tools and practices supporting the evolution of agile teams, programs, and agile coaches, it remains the case that very little has been offered for agile managers and leaders: no coherent set of tools, few if any practices, and an utterly unclear role definition. Lacking education, lacking distinctions, and frequently lacking credence from within the Agile community that the role is even valuable, it is no wonder managers and leaders have struggled with what it means to lead and manage in an agile environment.

    In 2013, Michael Spayd, Lyssa Adkins and I decided to join forces to design a potent curriculum for agile managers and leaders. The goal was to provide managers and leaders with the kind of transformational learning experience that Coaching Agile Teams has long provided agile coaches. This past year, we conducted extensive testing and fine-tuning of the course concept; Managing Agile Environments is the fruition of that work.

    I am really excited to be offering this to the world and want to tell you all about it!

    This two-day workshop is designed for managers working in the middle management tier—by which we mean up to and including directors, and even, in some organizations, vice presidents. The workshop is tailor-made for the agile manager committed to developing the concrete skills and competencies that will make a difference in creating agile-enabled environments.

    As is true with Coaching Agile Teams, Managing Agile Environments builds on a substantive conceptual frame, having the added advantage of including our latest thought leadership within the emerging Integral Agile movement directly into its design. Like our other classes, learning is activated through focused exercises and experiential learning, making it abundantly tangible and real in the manager’s world. Beyond mere information or tips, Managing Agile Environments aims to create a fundamental shift in how attendees see their role as manager: from managing to results, to designing environments that create results. We believe this class will be the kind of signature training experience for managers that Coaching Agile Teams is for agile coaches.

    Managing Agile Environments (full description) is part of our transformational leadership curriculum that includes Leading Adaptive Organizations (a workshop for executive leaders) and the 5-day intensive Integral Agile Wizardry (meant for those leading and coaching enterprise transformations, both leaders and coaches). Our intention in offering this new curriculum is to bridge the gap between delivery agility and organizational agility—for only by activating the whole organization can we hope to realize the promise of agility.

    I am truly excited to finally be part of an offering that managers and leaders can embrace, with a dignity befitting the contribution they are called upon to make inside their companies, and, ultimately, in the world.

    I hope you will join us in Boston on February 23!

     

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    Agile Enterprise Transformation – Michael’s book excerpt http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/agile-enterprise-transformation-michaels-book-excerpt/ http://agilecoachinginstitute.com/agile-enterprise-transformation-michaels-book-excerpt/#comments Fri, 10 Jan 2014 03:32:24 +0000 http://www.agilecoachinginstitute.com/?p=3704 Well, I am proud and gratified to be able to release the first complete version of Downloading the Integral Operating System: A Framework of Enterprise Agile Transformation. I am very grateful for all the feedback we have received from the two Deep-Dive Study Groups and numerous class and conference presentations of the framework. I am especially grateful to my two friends and colleagues, Lyssa Adkins and Michael Hamman (co-author of the Integral Agile chapter) for their tireless and selfless support of this project.

    I am hopeful the Integral Agile Framework will start a new, more inclusive, multi-perspective conversation on what enterprise agility means, how we can get there, and what our role is in such a world transformation.

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    Update July 31, 2014 – Full Release (and Study Group)

    Download link for Rel 1.0 – temporarily unavailable due to copyright permission concerns.

    Well, I am proud and gratified to be able to release the first complete version of Downloading the Integral Operating System: A Framework of Enterprise Agile Transformation. I am very grateful for all the feedback we have received from the two Deep-Dive Study Groups and numerous class and conference presentations of the framework. I am especially grateful to my two friends and colleagues, Lyssa Adkins and Michael Hamman (co-author of the Integral Agile chapter) for their tireless and selfless support of this project.

    I am hopeful the Integral Agile Framework will start a new, more inclusive, multi-perspective conversation on what enterprise agility means, how we can get there, and what our role is in such a world transformation. The most important feedback you can offer is to start using the framework, then tell us where you succeeded, where you got stuck, and what you need next.

    One possible engagement mechanism is to join a Deep-Dive Study Groups. The first two sold out. If this is for you, add yourself to the wait list for the third one (probably starting in the Fall ’14).

    Good luck on your journey. Let us know what happens!

    Warm wishes,

    Michael, Agile2014, Orlando

     

     

    Update Jan. 31, ’14 – New Release and Study Group

    The first and second Deep-Dive Study Groups are full.   Add yourself to the wait list and we’ll let you know when we schedule another one.  Interest in this has been very high, so it’s very likely we will do it again.

    Thanks to those of you who downloaded the original and provided feedback. I am very happy to be able to release version 0.9 (link at the bottom of post)! It includes the all new Chapter 4 on the evolution of people and culture as it applies to Agile transformations. I have also revised Chapters 0 and 1 to make them more readable and impactful. I plan to release Chapter 5 (the final one in this book excerpt) by the end of July. Meanwhile, please read and comprehend Release 0.9 – there is lots of profound material to work with here.

    Work is continuing on an Integral Agile toolbox by a community of practitioners that are excited about applying this material to their work and life.

    And please let me know what you think about this release!

    -Michael

    ———————

    Original post:

    Well, it’s finally here! I am overjoyed to announce that an excerpt from my book – Coaching the Agile Enterprise, to be published by Addison-Wesley – is now available. I will be releasing the 80-some page excerpt in three phases, beginning today with the release of the first three chapters.

    It has been important for me, and for ACI generally, to get this Agile Enterprise Transformation framework out to the community as soon as possible for several reasons. First, the full book is taking considerably longer to write than I had planned, but the material is important for people to have now. Second, what I am releasing over the next month or two is the underlying framework for enterprise transformation; the full book will go into great detail on many different aspects of applying the framework, but the base framework can be used by people now, so why wait? Third, much of ACI’s developing curriculum into the foreseeable future will be based on the framework; by making it public now, we can begin incorporating applications into what we teach now, not later.

    I am also excited that the excerpt — which I have titled Downloading the Integral Operating System (IOS): A Framework for Agile Enterprise Transformation — is the first in the new ACI Monograph Series. These monograph’s will explore a variety of topics in the area of agile coaching, enterprise transformation, agile leadership, and other topics critical to you, our precious community.

    For all of us at the Agile Coaching Institute, we look forward to hearing what kind of impact our work creates, and what you need from us as together we build a brighter future.

    With tremendous warmth and gratitude for all your kind support,

    Michael (from Salt Lake City)

     

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